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Posts Tagged ‘Barrar’

A recent post from Peter Peryer along with my visit to the Wayne Barrar show at DPAG, has got me thinking again about the nature of photography as art.

In my own mind photography is art. Hanging about in a gallery stock room today with Laurence Aberhart and Ben Cauchi works just reiterated this to me. Peryer’s work is certainly art.

So why do I have more trouble in the equally as beautiful photos of Ans Westra and some of  Wayne Barrar‘s work? I see these as a possibly a cross into documentary and photo journalism. Marti Friedlander perhaps spans this? Perhaps there is no difference at all.

My reaction to art is often emotional. Photography as an art form is the perfect illustration of art being a way of seeing the world through another’s eyes.  Maybe my issue with more documentary type photos is that it is just what my eye might see, the more artistic photography is something I might never see for myself…I am not sure if that makes any sense. Also all the artists I have mentioned have a great range and there is no defining them really.

I was thinking about Anne Noble’s “In the Presence of Angels” series last week too. I like the blurring of definitions and realities there. Maybe this series appeals because in my loud and busy life, the apparent calm and simple quiet of the convent seems very desirable.


Anne Noble. The Walled Garden of the Enclosure. 1989. silver gelatin print

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Speak to me

I managed to get into Dunedin Art Gallery today, although I was “on the clock” so to speak, so it was a rushed trip.

I revisited ‘Beloved’ and apart from still really disliking the New Sensations room, I was again amazed at the depth of the collection. Spiritualized – the ramp with Michael Parekowhai’s The Bosom of Abraham work leading you down to McCahon’s Veronica is inspired.

I wanted to see Wayne Barrar’s ‘An Expanding Subterra‘ exhibition of photographs. It was good, but for me, raised the issue of whether this kind of photography is documentary or art or perhaps both?

Heather Straka’s The Asian was the treat. This was an exhibition that needed no interpretation for me (although there is an excellent one here by David Eggleton). The 50 (51 including the original?) paintings say it all. To what end though?

I did a drive by of the infamous Regan Gentry teeth (at the mouth of the harbour). There were HEAPS of people parked and looking at them which I guess must be good for public art. I will go back and look closer, but on first glance I wondered “where are the gums?” and felt maybe they would have been better set into the ground a bit.

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